Patriotic American Responds To Creeping Sharia in Schools

  • 05/12/2017
  • Source: AAN
  • by: Remington Strelivo
Remember back when liberals were against religion in schools?

The San Diego Unified School District in California recently launched an “anti-Islamophobia” measure—which quickly backfired when parents realized that it actually entailed teaching their children Islam.

One parent, Christopher Wyrick, went to a school board meeting to registered his complaint—and wound up dazzling the audience (and the internet) with one impassioned speech.

"I’m a taxpayer, a father, a husband, and a very, very proud American,” Wyrick said. "Over the years, I’ve had many titles. One of them I will not accept is infidel.”

He continued: There has been an argument over the years to keep religious beliefs out of schools, especially any that happen to be associated with Judaism or Christianity. So at what point did you decide that it was OK to teach my children about Islam?”

Wyrick also pointed out that the “anti-Islamophobia” initiative in San Diego public schools is sponsored by Council on American-Islamic Relations, which seeks to “implement a pro-Islam curriculum in schools.” CAIR has been linked to several terrorist organizations and has been accused of anti-semitism.

One board member tried to silence Wyrick, thanking him for his speech, but the courageous father refused to go: “Oh, dude, I’m going to go,” he said. "You’re going to have to drag me out of here.”

The crowd erupted with laughter and cheers, and urged Wyrick to continue. Finally, the school board called the police to escort Wyrick away from the podium.

“You guys are hypocrites and you should protect your children,” he called, as he stepped down.

Wyrick was followed by a number of other parents, also expressing their anger at the new pro-Islamic curriculum in San Diego public schools—but it was Wyrick’s impassioned speech that made the biggest impact.
 Source: AAN
Tags: Issues: Terrorism, Creeping Sharia, Religion of Peace; Categories:

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