Dehydrated Child Dies After Days-Long Forced March By Parents, Libs Blame Border Patrol

  • 2018-12-14
  • Source: AAN
  • by: AAN Staff
Dehydrated Child Dies After Days-Long Forced March By Parents, Libs Blame Border Patrol
By U.S. Customs and Border Protection [CC BY-SA 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0) or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Left-leaning news outlets dropped a horrendous story about a 7-year-old Guatemalan girl who died a week after being taken into custody by U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

There's just one problem: the story – while heartbreaking – is incredibly misleading, as a report by Politico's Huddle newsletter reveals.

The Daily Caller's Emily Larsen explains:
 

“Top House Democrats are calling for a ‘full investigation’ into the death of a 7-year-old girl from Guatemala, who died of dehydration and shock just one week after she was taken into Border Patrol Custody,” the newsletter said.

Laypeople on Twitter also claimed Friday that the girl was in Border Patrol custody for a week before dying.

 
Here's the truth:
 

The girl was in Border Patrol custody for around eight hours before local emergency services transported her to an El Paso hospital, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) said. She reportedly had not eaten or had water for several days. The girl died after less than 24 hours in the hospital.

...

News outlets reported the girl’s death about a week after the incident. Border Patrol took the 7-year-old and her father into custody on Dec. 6 outside of Lordsburg, N.M., the Washington Post reported Thursday. They were part of a group of 163 migrants who approached border agents to turn themselves in.


Upon being taken into custody, Border Patrol paramedics took the girl's temperature and found she had a life-threatening 106-degree fever. Emergency services airlifted the child to an El Paso hospital, where she went into cardiac arrest and died.
 Source: AAN
Tags: Issues: Immigration, All Lives Matter, AAN Exclusive; Categories:

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