AOC's Climate Conspiracy Corrected by Meteorologist

  • 2019-05-24
  • Source: AAN
  • by: AAN Staff
AOC's Climate Conspiracy Corrected by Meteorologist
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez majored in international relations and economics (yes, we're serious) – but that didn't stop her from weighing in on Washington, D.C.'s tornado warning yesterday.

Naturally, the Democratic Socialist chalked up a late May thunderstorm to climate change. 

One meteorologist corrected her, patiently explaining the distinction between "weather and climate."

Per Fox News:
 

The freshman congresswoman began by sharing a video on Instagram briefly showing the conditions outside, as heavy rains drenched the region and prompted a brief, and rare, tornado warning inside the Beltway.

“There's people stuck outside. We need to get them out,” Ocasio-Cortez said. “This is crazy."



 

The Green New Deal advocate then shared a story published by PBS in March questioning if climate change makes tornadoes worse and put emphasis on a quote from the piece that read, "Rather than lie squarely in the Great Plains, America’s tornadoes appear to be sliding into the Midwest and Southeast."

...

"Tornadoes are challenging to link to climate change links due to their nature (geographically, limited, acute patterns, how they form, etc.)," Ocasio-Cortez told her followers as she reviewed the article. "But we DO know that tornadoes HAVE been changing. They are no longer being limited to the Great Plains, and are shifting to other regions of the country."


While laypeople regard tornado alley as confined to squarely in the Plains, the entire Midwest and Southeast are very prone to tornadic activity.
 

Improved Average Annual Tornado Reports.svg
By Mamatus - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Average_Annual_Tornado_Reports.jpg, GFDL, Link


Meteorologist Ryan Maue then corrected the congresswoman:
 
Mr. Maue has a Ph.D. in meteorology, so we're inclined to take his word. Sorry, AOC.
 Source: AAN
Tags: Issues: Liberal Loon, Socialism Sucks, Video; Categories:

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